FAME by Anaka Morris

Fame by Anaka Morris

the series entitled, "Fame," by Portland born, LA based photographer, Anaka Morris. we asked her a few questions about her elegant photos, all taken with film. please enjoy her images and words below. 

 yasiin bey LA 2015

yasiin bey LA 2015

for my “Fame” project i am mixing my ethnographic directed research on the concept and social relevance of fame with portraits of artists i shoot through photography and short film. i am particularly interested in how an artist’s persona matches with their “true” identities. this juxtaposition is interesting to me because an artist’s persona is usually so solidified that an artist may have a hard time letting their identity grow and develop over time. i mostly shoot hip hop musicians because they are arguably the most idolized form of artist in our culture.
— Anaka Morris
 Ham on Everything

Ham on Everything

although we all see fame as a sole goal most artists work toward, everyone’s perception of success is different. this is why i have become interested in all levels of fame. i seek to show all the artists i shoot at the same level despite the hierarchical levels they may be in other people’s minds relating to their level of fame.
— Anaka Morris
 Kembe X

Kembe X

i have definitely noticed artists pushing their personas as i shoot them, but I have also been able to get to a comfortable enough level with most of the artists i shoot so they are not thrown off by the camera. shooting in film has also helped the relaxation level, leading my subjects to feel automatically comfortable with me because the action of taking the photo takes a lot longer than a digital camera.
— Anaka Morris
 Kali Uchis

Kali Uchis

these images are important because i am a part of a big artistic cultural movement puzzle that documents what is going on. i am mostly focused on documenting artist’s relationships with themselves and each other in order to document artists who are changing art (and the world) for the best. i see the most driven artists as those who have been raised, and despite social disadvantages are finding ways to shine through our societal elements that don’t really matter at all in the end. what really matters is the ability to recognize cultural movements and make it strong enough for people to follow and support positively.
— Anaka Morris
 simz

simz

FAME by Anaka Morris